Documentation

    PLEASE NOTE: This document applies to v0.5 version and not to the latest stable release v1.1

    Documentation for other releases can be found by using the version selector in the left bottom of any doc page.

    Rook Standalone

    Directly on Linux Host

    Rook can be deployed as a standalone service directly on any modern Linux host by running the following:

    1. Start a one-node Rook cluster
      docker run -it --net=host rook/rook:v0.5.1
      
    2. Download the latest rookctl binary
      wget https://github.com/rook/rook/releases/download/v0.4.0/rook-v0.4.0-linux-amd64.tar.gz
      tar xvf rook-v0.4.0-linux-amd64.tar.gz
      
    3. Verify the Rook cluster is ready
      ./rookctl status
      

    At this point, you can use the rookctl tool along with some simple steps to create and manage block, file and object storage.

    Vagrant

    Rook is also easy to run in virutal machines with vagrant using the standalone Vagrantfile. When instructed, vagrant will start up CoreOS virtual machines and launch rook via rkt. Note that you can make configuration changes as desired in the provided cloud config file.

    cd cluster/examples/standalone
    vagrant up
    

    Rook Client Tool

    Once the Rook cluster in Vagrant is running and initialized, you can use the rookctl client tool to manage the cluster and consume the storage. First, either use a locally built rookctl tool or download the latest release from github:

    wget https://github.com/rook/rook/releases/download/v0.4.0/rook-v0.4.0-linux-amd64.tar.gz
    tar xvf rook-v0.4.0-linux-amd64.tar.gz
    

    Verify the cluster is up and running:

    export ROOK_API_SERVER_ENDPOINT="172.20.20.10:8124"
    ./rookctl status
    

    At this point, you can use the rookctl tool along with some simple steps to create and manage block, file and object storage.

    Clean up

    When you are all done with your Rook cluster in Vagrant, you can clean everything up by destroying the VMs with:

    vagrant destroy -f
    rm -f .discovery-token
    

    Design

    Rook supports an environment where there is no orchestration platform. Rook comes with its own basic orchestration engine based on Etcd that is activated when not running in Kubernetes.

    Standalone Rook Architecture

    The Rook daemon rook is a Docker container that has all that is needed to bootstrap, scale and manage a storage cluster. Each machine in the cluster must run the Rook daemon.

    rook embeds Etcd to store configuration and coordinate cluster-wide management operations. rook will automatically bootstrap Etcd, manage it, and scale it as the cluster grows. It’s also possible to use an external Etcd instead of the embedded one if needed.

    Standalone Rook still requires some key orchestration features such as resource management, health monitoring, failover, and upgrades. If this scenario is interesting to you, contributions are welcome!